Restoring the Bride of Messiah

The Worship of Semiramis

Semiramis, who was both Nimrod's wife and Tammuz’ mother, was worshiped as the "mother of god" and a "fertility goddess" because she had to be extremely fertile to give birth to all the pagan incarnate gods that represented Nimrod. Where Nimrod is the "sun god", Semiramis is the "moon goddess'. She was worshiped throughout the world by each of the titles associated with Nimrod's worship, in addition to many titles unique to herself (see table below). For instance, the respective Greek and Roman names applied to the worship of Semiramis include: Aphrodite and Venus, the goddess of love; Artemis and Diana, the goddess of hunting and childbirth; Athena and Minerva, the goddess of crafts, war and wisdom; Demeter and Ceres, the goddess of growing things; Gaea and Terra, symbol of the fertile earth; Hera and Juno, the protector of marriage and women, who was the sister and wife of Zeus in Greek mythology, and the wife of Jupiter in Roman mythology; Hestia and Vesta, the goddess of the hearth; plus Rhea or Ops, who was wife and sister of the Greek horned-god Kronos.
 

Mother and Son Worship

Semiramis was initially included in the pagan Babylonian trinity as the holy spirit or seed of the divine son in his mother's womb. With time, however, the father Nimrod was practically overlooked and worshiped only as the god-incarnate son in his mother's arms. In other words, the father became invisible and was no longer worshiped, whereas, the mother with the god-incarnate son in her arms became the grand object of worship. Numerous Babylonian monuments show the goddess-mother Semiramis with her son in her arms. This worship of mother and child spread throughout the known world, and given different names in the various languages of the world. Ancient Germans worshipped the virgin Hertha with child in arms. Scandinavians called her Disa pictured with child. The Egyptian mother and child were worshiped as Isis with the infant Osiris or Horus seated on his mother's lap. In India, the mother and child were called Devaki and Krishna, and also Isi and Iswara as they are worshiped to this day. In Asia, they were known as Cybele and Deoius; in pagan Rome, as Fortuna and Jupiter-puer, or Jupiter, the boy; in Greece, as Ceres, the great mother with babe at her breast, or as Irene, the goddess of peace, with the boy Plutus in her arms.
 
The image of mother with child in her arms was so firmly entrenched in the pagan mind that after the time Christianity appeared on the scene in the fourth century, these statues and paintings were merely renamed and worshiped as the virgin Mary with her god-incarnate son Jesus. Thus, the pagan mother and child entered Christianity as the Roman Catholic worship of Mary with the infant Jesus. In fact, in Tibet, China, and Japan, Jesuit missionaries were astonished to find the counterpart of the madonna and child as devoutly worshiped as they were in Rome. Shing Moo, the holy mother in China was portrayed with a child in her arms and a glory around her, exactly as if she had been fashioned by Roman Catholic artisans.
 
 This is a photo of an ancient mother/child symbol rich in sun god symbolism. Notice the sun burst and sun nimbus around the head of the mother and a similar nimbus around the head of the child.

This photo was taken inside the Shrine of the Holy Seplechur in Jerusalem, a very old and dank religious monstrosity. 

 

Mother Worship

The pagan mother initially derived her deification from the divine nature attributed to her child. She was raised far above the level of all creatures, and worshiped as a partaker of the trinitarian godhead. The mother eventually became the preferred object of worship. The son was exhibited merely as a child in his mother's arms without any particular attraction, whereas the mother's image was displayed in magnificent artistic array and invested with the exquisite beauty attributed to Semiramis during her life.
  
To justify worship of the mother, she was elevated to a divine station just like her god-incarnate son. The deified queen mother was adored as the incarnation of the holy spirit of peace and love. The highest titles were accordingly bestowed on her. In Egypt, the mother was styled Athor, the "habitation of god" to signify that all the "fullness of the godhead" dwelt in her womb. She was named Hestia in Greece and Vesta, which is just a Roman variation of the same name, meaning the "dwelling-place of deity."
  
Under her title, "mother of the gods," the goddess queen of Babylon became an object of universal worship. The mother of the gods was worshiped by the Persians, the Syrians, and with the most profound religious veneration by all the kings of Europe and Asia. When Caesar invaded Britain, he discovered the Druid priests worshiping the "mother of god" as Virgo-Patitura.
  
In Egypt, as the "queen of heaven" she was the greatest and most worshiped of all the divinities. During Egyptian bondage, the Israelites repeatedly departed from the one true invisible Elohim and worshiped the pagan mother. When the Israelites fell into apostasy under King Solomon, they worshiped this mother goddess as Ashtaroth (Asherah), a name by which the pagan Babylonian goddess was known to the Israelites:
  
And the people of Israel again did what was evil in the sight of YHWH, and served the Baals [various lord gods depicting Nimrod] and the Ashtaroth [Semiramis], the gods of Syria, the gods of Sidon, the gods of Moab, the gods of the Ammonites, and the gods of the Philistines; and they forsook YHWH, and did not serve him. - Judges
  
Later, during the time of the prophet Jeremiah, the Jews worshiped the queen of heaven so devoutly that they could not be convinced to give up this paganism even after Jerusalem had been burnt and the land desolated due to this very pagan worship:
 
Then all the men who knew that their wives had offered incense to other gods, and all the women who stood by, a great assembly, all the people who dwelt in Pathros in the land of Egypt, answered Jeremiah: "As for the word which you have spoken to us in the name of YHWH, we will not listen to you. But we will do everything that we have vowed, burn incense to the queen of heaven [Semiramis] and pour out libations to her, as we did, both we and our fathers, our kings and our princes, in the cities of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem; for then we had plenty of food, and prospered, and saw no evil. But since we left off burning incense to the queen of heaven and pouring out libations to her, we have lacked everything and have been consumed by the sword and by famine." And the women said, "When we burned incense to the queen of heaven and poured out libations to her, was it without our husbands' approval that we made cakes for her bearing her image and poured out libations to her?Jeremiah
 

Common names applied to the pagan goddess Semiramis

 Title Roman Greek
 Goddess of Love Venus Aphrodite
 Goddess of Hunting & Childbirth Diana  Artemis
 Goddess of Crafts, War & Wisdom Minerva  Athena
 Goddess of Growing Things Ceres Demeter
 Symbol of the Fertile EarthTerra Gaea
 Protector of Marriage & Women Juno  Hera
 Goddess of the Hearth  Vesta Hestia
 Wife and Sister of Kronos  Ops Rhea

Worship of mother and child spread from Babylon to the ends of the earth, but were called different names in the languages of the various counties where their worship appeared. The ancient Germans worshipped the virgin HERTHA with the child in the arms of his mother. The Scandinavians called her DISA pictured with her child. In Egypt, the mother and her child were worshiped as ISIS with the infant OSIRIS or HORUS seated on his mother's lap. In India, the mother and child were called DEVAKIand KRISHNA, and also ISI and ISWARA as they are worshiped to this day. In Asia, they were known as CYBELE and DEOIUS; in pagan Rome, as FORTUNA and JUPITER-PUER, or the boy JUPITER; in Greece, as CERES, the great mother with babe at her breast, or as IRENE, the goddess of peace, with the boy PLUTUSin her arms. Even in Tibet, China, and Japan, Jesuit missionaries were astonished to find the Roman counterpart of MADONNA and child. SHING MOO, the holy mother in China was portrayed with a child in her arms and a glory around her.
 
Semiramis was worshiped in Ephesus as the pagan fertility goddess DIANA who represented the generative powers of nature. She was referred to as a fertility goddess because she mothered all the numerous pagan gods representing the god-incarnate Tammuz. Diana was pictured with numerous teats so that she could nurse all the pagan gods, and she wore a tower-shaped crown symbolizing the Babylonian tower of Babel.
 
Legend has it that after Semiramis died, she ascended into heaven and was returned to earth inside a large egg which fell into the Euphrates river. The egg was pushed ashore by a dove and she emerged from the egg as Astarte or Ishtar (in English, Easter). To show her gratitude to the dove, she turned it into an egg-laying rabbit, all signs of fertility. Another sign or symbol found throughout Babylonia is the obelisk, a phallic symbol. These can also be seen in Egypt, Rome and Washington DC. The obelisk in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican was dragged up to Rome from Egypt. The Washington Monument is a sign that Babylon is alive and well in the USA!

In the seventh century C.E., when Rome sought to harness the power of the great population of Ishmaelites in the desert and use them to purge Jews and Messianic believers from the holy land, they groomed a handsome young lad named Mohammed to lead them. They were the creators of the religion of Islam with the moon goddess, Ashteroth (Semiramis) as their god -  Allah.
 
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